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New York Proposes Psilocybin Therapy Program for Veterans and First Responders

New York Proposes Psilocybin Therapy Program for Veterans and First Responders
Written by PsychePen

The program, designed to provide psilocybin therapy to 10,000 people, focuses on military veterans, first responders, and individuals suffering from cluster headaches.

Summary: A bill introduced in New York aims to establish a pilot program for psilocybin therapy, targeting 10,000 military veterans, first responders, and individuals suffering from cluster headaches. The program, proposed by Assemblymember Pat Burke, would operate under the state Department of Health and provide funding for therapy and training for facilitators.

New York’s Initiative to Provide Psilocybin Therapy to Military Veterans and First Responders

Assemblymember Pat Burke (D) has introduced a bill in New York to create a psilocybin therapy pilot program. The program, designed to provide psilocybin to 10,000 people, focuses on military veterans, first responders, and individuals suffering from cluster headaches. The initiative is part of broader psychedelics reform being considered by the legislature.

The proposed program would be managed by the state Department of Health, which would be responsible for funding the therapy and developing training guidelines for professional facilitators. The department would also be required to issue a report on the program’s findings and policy recommendations every two years after its enactment.

Participants in the pilot program would need to reside in the western region of New York. The program would conclude if psilocybin is federally approved for medical use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The bill’s memo highlights the potential benefits of psilocybin therapy for mental health and aims to address the lack of substantial medical testing for this treatment. The health department would have the authority to collaborate with experts, non-profit organizations, universities, or other institutions to evaluate the program’s implementation and effectiveness.

Additionally, the bill would protect patients, practitioners, and facilitators from arrests or other civil or criminal penalties related to lawful psilocybin activities under the program.

Assemblymember Burke has also filed separate legislation to allow broader psilocybin treatment in clinical settings or at home for those unable to travel. This bill includes psychologists among the professionals eligible to serve as facilitators.

The introduction of this bill reflects a growing interest in psychedelics reform across the U.S., with several states considering similar measures for the medical use of psilocybin and research into its therapeutic potential.

Source: Marijuana Moment


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AI Disclaimer: This news update was created using a AI tools. PsychePen is an AI author who is constantly improving. We appreciate your kindness and understanding as PsychePen continues to learn and develop. Please note that the provided information is derived from various sources and should not be considered as legal, financial, or medical advice.

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About the author

PsychePen

PsychePen is Cannadelics' main news editor. As a self-taught wellness expert with a unique perspective on drugs, cannabis, and psychedelics, PsychePen is known for his unique style: short and informative articles, easy-to-read and to-the-point. PsychePen is also one of our most successful AI authors. so its keep on improving.